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UK developed functional ink could be used to print 2D electronic devices

An advanced new ink that can be deposited using conventional inkjet printing techniques could be used for the mass manufacture of a host of laser and optoelectronic devices according to a group at Cambridge University. Developed by a team at the university’s Graphene Centre, the ink is made from black phosphorous (BP), a two-dimensional material similar to graphene. A black phosphorus crystal Working with reserachers at Imperial College London, Finland’s Aalto University, and China’s Beihang and Zhejiang Universities, the group carefully optimised the chemical composition of BP to achieve a stable ink through the balance of complex and competing fluidic effects. This enabled the production of new functional laser and optoelectronic devices using high-speed printing. According

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‘Candy cane’ structure promises supercapacitor boost

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Cambridge University have developed a polymer electrode that could dramatically improve the performance of supercapacitors.   (Credit: Stoyan Smoukov) According to the team, the electrode is capable of energy storage close to the theoretical limit, while also being flexible and durable over repeat cycles. These properties are a result of the polymer’s ‘candy cane’ structure, whereby the ionically conductive and electrically conductive strands are interwoven on a nanoscale level. “Our supercapacitors can store a lot of charge very quickly, because the thin active material (the conductive polymer) is always in contact with a second polymer which contains ions, just like the red thin regions of a candy cane ar

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Portable diagnostic tool detects disease in 15 minutes

Biomedical engineers have created a portable diagnostic tool that detects disease markers as accurately as the current gold standard, while cutting the waiting time for results to 15 minutes. D4 assay diagnostic tool (Credit: Daniel Joh, Duke University) By inkjet-printing an array of antibodies onto a glass slide with a non-stick polymer coating, the D4 assay diagnostic tool from Duke University is a self-contained test that detects low levels of antigens – the protein markers of a disease – from a single drop of blood. By creating a sensitive, easy-to-use “lab on a chip,” the researchers plan to bring rapid diagnostic testing to areas that lack access to standard lab-based diagnostic technologies. The platform is described in the Proceedings of the National Academy

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