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Monitoring blood sugar painlessly with Radar and AI

The University of Waterloo have collaborated with Google and Infineon to combine radar alongside artificial intelligence to create a detector which measures blood sugar levels without the need to draw blood.  Using high frequency radio waves, the new glucose monitoring system can detect levels of sugar in the blood and how they differ which are then analysed by an artificial intelligence where the information is converted into useful readings of up to 500 wave features.  “We want to sense blood inside the body without actually having to sample any fluid,” said George Shaker, an engineering professor who leads a large team working on the concept. “Our hope is this can be realised as a smartwatch to monitor glucose continuously.” The university are now in the proce

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Wearable and biocompatible circuits in development

Researchers within China’s National Centre for Nanoscience and Technology have developed a flexible, biocompatible material which holds stretchable circuits, enabling the potential for wearable and biocompatible electronics.  Made using screen printing and microfluidic patterning, the  non-toxic, metal-polymer conductor is made with gallium and indium within a silicon-based polymer substrate, holding a liquid metal to allow a flow of electricity. The pliable nature of the material suggests that the electric circuits can not only be worn, but also may also be implanted into the body to help treat disease or stimulate DNA in membranes of living cells.  “These are the first flexible electronics that are at once highly conductive and stretchable, fully biocompatible, a

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15 million degrees celsius reached by Tokamak Energy

For the first time in history, a temperature reaching 15 million degrees Celsius has been reached - hotter than the Sun’s core - during privately funded UK research, Tokamak Energy.  Through merging compression, the ST40 device was able to release plasma rings, involving high electric currents within internal coils, causing magnetic reconnection, in turn creating heat. This process is said to place high demands on the system and therefore uses complex electrical engineering process.  Despite all this, however, the 15 million degrees celsius mark is still quite far from the ultimate goal, which currently stands at 100million degrees in order to achieve thermonuclear fusion on Earth.  “We are taking significant steps towards achieving fusion energy, doing so with

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