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Newly developed brain tumour blood test.

Combining infrared and AI, a new blood test which can accurately detect cancer at 87% has been developed by a team of researchers at the University of Strathclyde. Brain tumours have always been hard to detect and diagnose due to their symptoms, such as headaches and memory loss, being associated with a number of different ailments. This new blood test is said to help doctors rapidly diagnose patients and can characterise the biochemical profile.  “This is the first publication of data from our clinical feasibility study and it is the first demonstration that our blood test works in the clinic,” said research lead Dr Matthew Baker, chief scientific officer at ClinSpec Diagnostics and reader in Strathclyde’s Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry. “Earlier detection

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Flexible Fracture Method inspired by skin

The Associate Professor, Guy German, in the biomedical engineering department as Binghamton University, New York, has dedicated time to researching ways to extend the lifetime of biomedical devices. He has done this through moving cracks away from the crucial components. His team at Binghamton University have developed both single and dual layered membranes from silicone based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which has been inspired by the topography of the natural human skin. The layers are said to help control the amount of cracks and prevent damage to electrical and critical components of the device.   “Even though this membrane looks and feels exactly like a normal, boring membrane, you stretch it and you can get cracks to deviate at 45-degree angles away from where it ordinaril

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New Life Saving Heart Pump Developed

A medical research team at Leicester University are currently developing a brand new heart pump which can help those who are suffering with heart failure. Also known as the LVAD - or Left Ventricular Assist Device - the artificial heart pump can be used on those who are currently waiting for a heart transplant, but are not likely to survive the wait.  The surgery will include a laparoscopic surgery, where the new heart pump can be inserted not into, but next to the existing heart, as to avoid as much possibility of infection and blood clotting. The LVAD is said to save and improve the quality of lives of patients worldwide and is being funded by the British Heart Foundation.  Dr David Adlam, Associate Professor and Interventional Cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovas

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New Hydrogel to promote bone healing

Bioengineers from UCLA have developed and published findings about their new clay-enhanced hydrogel which promotes bone healing. The finding published describes how the gel was injected into a mouse which was suffering from a skull defect. The findings show that the hydrogel induced the migration of naturally occurring stem cells, which in turn aided the mouse in the bone healing process. Unfortunately, the hydrogel is still in its early days as the process is still fairly expensive and like all medical interventions, can come with side effects. Saying this, the clay-enhanced hydrogel, is able to repair and regenerate tissue in the surrounding areas as the structure of the gel is similar to that of living tissue. In order to help overcome the issues of price and side effects, t

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New Robotic Neck Brace to support ALS

Engineers and Neurologists in Columbia have worked together to develop a new robotic neck brace which is said to dramatically help those suffering with ALS, in a way which no other device has done before.  People with ALS can lost completely lose all mobility of the head, but with this device, their heads can be held in a specific position as well as actively aiding their range of motion.  The neck brace contains sensors and actuators which not only can help the original position of the head, but can also restore up to 70% of the range of the human head. This is achieved by measurements recorded by the sensors and surface EMG of Electromyography on the neck muscles.  “The brace would also be useful to modulate rehabilitation for those who have suffered whiplash neck injuries

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New Self-Healing Material

A new stretchy material has been developed between Stanford University and the Korea Institute of Science & Technology. This material is conductive, meaning that it is able to stimulate the healing process without any further help from external methods. The material itself will be used in within a wearable device, and the strength can be determined by how stretched the material is. The more under strain the material becomes, the better the boost in conductivity, and thus the stronger the help the wearer will receive. During tests of the material, the boost in conductivity was said to increased 60-fold under a strain of 3,500 percent. Despite being constantly stretched, the material is meant to be incredibly strong and was developed to match the strength of human skin to make it

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Sight Saving Technology from a new low cost OCT Scanner

A new redesigned, 3D Printed Spectrometer may become the next low-cost portable OCT Scanner which would have the ability to save sight. It currently weighs 15 times lighter then a standard commercial system and costs less than a tenth of the current price. Since the current commercial are so expensive, they cannot be used as regularly to help treat macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. “The key to preventing blindness is early detection,” said Adam Wax, professor of biomedical engineering at Duke. “Our goal is to make OCT drastically less expensive so more clinics can afford the devices, especially in global health settings.” “Right now OCT devices sit in their own room and require a PhD scientist to tweak them to get everything working just right,” said Wa

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New Records from a 3D-printed Thermoelectric device

The Specific Innovation and Knowledge Centre at Swansea University claims that they have been able to produce a thermoelectric device that is approximately 50 percent more efficient than a standard device. The team added additve manufacturing techniques to a standard thermoelectric device which not only can prove to reach this new record, but will still be cheap enough to produce in bulk. Created using Tin Selenide, the device has a high potential for thermoelectric behaviour. Industries that could benefit from such materials include steelmaking, which generates huge amounts of heat and also requires electrical power. Tata Steel is about to support a PhD researcher on the Swansea team to explore the industrial applications of their technology. “Turning waste heat into electri

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New MOANA headset to link thoughts to computers

MOANA, a four year project, has been led by a team at Rice University in Texas to design and develop a new headset to link human brains and our thoughts to machines and computers, non surgically. The overall need to design a link between machines and brains is to allow the transmission of visual images to blind patients. The project has been funded by a programme known as DARPA, who are also developing more wearable interfaces which can communicate with the brain. “In four years, we hope to demonstrate direct, brain-to-brain communication at the speed of thought and without brain surgery,” said Rice’s Jacob Robinson, the lead investigator on the $18m project, which was announced on May 20, 2019 as part of DARPA’s Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program.

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