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New 3D Bioprinting Technique: In-Air Microfludics

The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, also known as AAAS, recently released in a paper that their in-air microfluidics technique can enable the rapid production of micro building blocks. Microfluidic Chips, which hold small fluidic channels and used to manipulate drops of fluid, is said to help repair damaged tissue, however the chips alone cannot mass produce enough for clinical use. However, the AAAS have created a 3D bioprinting technique which could facilitate this idea and can offer a solution whereby the fluids are passed through the air as opposed to microchannels found in Microfluidic chips, hence producing a quicker technique. Using two jets of droplets, this technique shoots the microfluid up to 1000 times than the standard microchip technique. As a r

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The Development of the Vehicle-to-Grid system

We all know that electric cars reduce emissions of greenhouse cases when on the road, however did you know that they will also be able to supply energy which has been stored in the battery back to the grid when parked up? The vehicle-to-grid technology, also referred to as V2G, can aid the stability of electric networks and renewable energy sources by recharging when the demand is low but also returning any stored energy when the demand is high. Creating a cycle of renewable energy, this system is thought to support an increase use of the renewable energy resources. 21 new projects, sharing a £30m competition fund, are now underway in the UKs latest push to develop the technology further within vehicle-to-grid charging. The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and the Department for

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New materials for lithium-ion batteries could double range of electric vehicles

Innovate UK funds Nexeon-led academic-industry project to develop improved materials for lithium-ion batteries. Part of the Faraday Battery Challenge, announced by business secretary Greg Clark last year, the project is developing materials based on silicon to replace carbon in the anode of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. Other partners in the project include University College London (UCL) and Synthomer, a polymer manufacturer and developer; these partners contribute to the project’s name: SUNRISE (Synthomer, UCL and Nexeon’s Rapid Improvement in the Storage of Energy). [caption id="attachment_1229" align="aligncenter" width="690"] Nexeon will lead development of the new silicon material at its facilities, shown here. Photo Credit: The Engineer.[/caption] The total cos

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London’s black cabs go electric

Hybrid electric black cabs are officially ready to take to the streets of London.   After several months of testing, the London EV Company’s (LEVC) TX taxi has been fully certified and can start taking its first passengers. The hybrid vehicle features a battery electric powertrain with a small backup petrol generator. It has an overall range up to 400 miles, with an 80-mile pure electric range. The six-seater cab also features a filter system to remove gases and particles from incoming air, as well as a sensor that closes the external air intake when it detects elevated levels of pollution. “After extensive testing, LEVC’s new taxi is ready to do the job it was made for: transport people around this great city of London safely, cleanly and stylishly,” said Chris Gubbey, C

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CYRIL shines a light on the brains of newborn babies

A research team at UCL has developed CYRIL, a new tool that non-invasively monitors brain tissue physiology in newborn babies to help doctors make more informed clinical decisions. Monitoring a baby with CYRIL - Photo Credit: The Engineer The compact broadband near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system has been developed by UCL’s Multimodal-Spectroscopy (MMS Group) team. The portable device, which is small enough for use in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and accident and emergency (A&E) rooms, is currently being used in preclinical studies and in clinical studies in the neonatal unit at University College London Hospital (UCLH). During birth, disruptions in blood and oxygen supply to a baby’s brain can stop it from working properly. This can lead to an acute injury to

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Smart fabric can detect and protect against toxic gases

Scientists from Dartmouth College in New Hampshire are developing smart fabrics that can detect the presence of hazardous gases as well as protect the wearer from their effects.   The SOFT e-textile uses metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to improve detection and protection from toxic chemicals (Credit: KA Mirica) Known as SOFT (Self-Organised Framework on Textiles), the material is flexible and conductive, yet porous and washable. According to the Dartmouth team, the fabric is capable of real-time gas detection. It’s envisaged that the material would be worn by military and emergency services personnel in conjunction with a haz-mat suit, alerting the user to a breach in the primary barrier. “By adding this fabric to a protective suit, sensors can alert the user if a chemical

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StreetDrone autonomous test vehicle aimed at universities

UK start-up StreetDrone has released its first autonomous vehicle, an affordable platform designed to be used as a testbed by student engineers. StreetDrone One, which has been developed by a team of ex-F1 engineers, is based on the Renault Twizy electric vehicle. According to its creators, it will help address the gap in autonomous research that is opening up between industry and academia due to the costs. The vehicle, which will be priced at £49,500, will enable young engineers to test existing software as well as designing their own. “What makes StreetDrone One so unique is that it allows universities to focus on their specific area of interest in the self-driving market and customise the testbed to their requirements,” said Mark Preston, founder and CEO of StreetDrone. 

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UK laser cannon unveiled at DSEI

A key component of a high energy laser cannon being produced under a £30 million contract for the UK Ministry of Defence was unveiled in London this week, at military equipment exhibition DSEI 2017. Under development by an MBDA-led consortium which includes Qinetiq, Leonardo-Finmeccanica, Arke, BAE Systems, Marshall and GKN the so-called Dragonfire system will be a 50kW class directed energy weapon designed for use on both land and sea. Laser weapons have key advantages over traditional systems: the munition is potentially unlimited, and it operates at the speed of light so the time from when you say “fire” to the weapon hitting its target is more or less instantaneous. According to the consortium the weapon – which is being optimised for use on land and

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Jaguar Land Rover to go all-electric by 2020

From 2020, all new vehicles produced by Jaguar Land Rover will be electrified, the firm’s CEO Dr Ralf Speth has claimed. “Every new Jaguar Land Rover model line will be electrified from 2020, giving our customers even more choice,” said Speth. “We will introduce a portfolio of electrified products across our model range, embracing fully electric, plug-in hybrid and mild hybrid vehicles.” Speth’s announcement follows similar news from Volvo and adds to the growing momentum behind electric vehicles. His comments were made at the car firm’s inaugural Tech Fest – a technology showcase at London’s St Martins College – where, as well as hosting debates on the future of mobility, it was also showcasing a number of existing and future electric models. Amongst v

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UK developed functional ink could be used to print 2D electronic devices

An advanced new ink that can be deposited using conventional inkjet printing techniques could be used for the mass manufacture of a host of laser and optoelectronic devices according to a group at Cambridge University. Developed by a team at the university’s Graphene Centre, the ink is made from black phosphorous (BP), a two-dimensional material similar to graphene. A black phosphorus crystal Working with reserachers at Imperial College London, Finland’s Aalto University, and China’s Beihang and Zhejiang Universities, the group carefully optimised the chemical composition of BP to achieve a stable ink through the balance of complex and competing fluidic effects. This enabled the production of new functional laser and optoelectronic devices using high-speed printing. According

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