news

Raspberry Pi wins top UK engineering prize

Raspberry Pi, the UK-made microcomputer credited with inspiring a new generation of coders, has won the Royal Academy of Engineering 2017 MacRobert Award. Since its launch in 2012, around 14 million of the devices – which retails for £28 – have been sold, re-engaging people with the power of coding, and helping to ensure that future generations are equipped for the increasingly digital jobs of the future. https://youtu.be/YPDehg1pL9A The technology has also had a major and unexpected impact within industry, with over half of the devices produced used for control applications in a variety of sectors. Based in Cambridge, the organisation behind the device is run as a not for profit firm, and profits are invested in initiatives aimed at teaching people about computing. The de

read more

news

Processing innovation opens up new pathway for specialist steel

A method for making low-weight, high-strength steel more manufacturable could have important implications for the automotive sector. Car manufacturers, trying to reduce the weight of vehicles, are interested in low-weight, high-strength grades of steel. But some of these metals have properties which make them difficult to manufacture and process in large quantities. Material scientists at the University of Warwick have now found a way to control the properties of these materials so they can be rolled and formed like conventional steel. The problem up to now has been that strong, lightweight steel alloy grades tend to have brittle phases that make them hard, but stiff and unworkable. Two of these phases, according to the team led by Alireza Rahnama of Warwick Manufacturing group, ar

read more

news

New form of carbon is tough and elastic

A joint US-China research team has discovered a new form of carbon that is ultra strong, yet elastic like rubber.    (Photo credit: Timothy Strobel) Developed by engineers at Washington DC’s Carnegie Institute for Science and China’s Yanshan University, the material is also lightweight and electrically conductive. The researchers claim it could have a wide array of applications, ranging from aerospace engineering to military armour. To create it, the team pressurised and heated a structurally disordered form of carbon called glassy carbon. This starting material was brought to about 250,000 times normal atmospheric pressure and heated to around 1,000 degrees Celsius. Under the high-pressure synthesis conditions, disordered layers within the glassy carbon buckle, merg

read more

news

AI allows bionic hand to ‘see’ and grip

Biomedical engineers from Newcastle University have developed a computer vision system for prosthetic hands, allowing users to grasp and interact with common objects. Current upper limb prosthetics that can grip are controlled by myoelectric signals from the muscles in the stump, but it’s a skill that takes patience and time to master. Funded by the EPSRC, the Newcastle team created a computer vision system that enables prosthetics to ‘see’ with the assistance of an off-the-shelf camera. The work appears in the Journal of Neural Engineering. “Responsiveness has been one of the main barriers to artificial limbs,” said Dr Kianoush Nazarpour, senior lecturer in Biomedical Engineering at Newcastle University. “For many amputees the reference point is their healthy arm or leg,

read more

news

UK pod trials to test public acceptance of driverless vehicles

In the latest phase of a world-leading driverless car study autonomous pods begin operating along a 2km route around the Greenwich Peninsula in south- east London. Developed through the so-called GATEway Project (Greenwich Automated Transport Environment), the vehicles will use advanced sensors and autonomy software to detect and avoid obstacles whilst carrying members of the public participating in the study. The initiative, which is led by TRL and funded by government and industry, aims to demonstrate the use of automated vehicles for ‘last mile’ mobility, seamlessly connecting existing transport hubs with residential and commercial areas using a zero emission, low noise transport system. Research findings from the project will guide the wider roll out of automated vehi

read more

news

Progress towards bionic eye implants

Silicon nanowires and wireless technology combine to produce potential high-resolution implant to restore sight. Bionic eye technology has long lagged behind the science fictional portrayal. Although some progress has been made towards restoring sight using electronics and implants, the level of sight they can produce is still well below the accepted threshold for blindness. Engineers at the University of California – San Diego and a La Jolla-based start-up company called Nanovision Biosciences now report that they have developed new technology that directly stimulates retinal cells to potentially restore high resolution sight that has been lost owing to neurodegenerative diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of sight owing to diabetes: all major cause

read more

news

Boeing to manufacture actuation systems in Sheffield

Boeing plans to open its first manufacturing plant in Europe with a facility in Sheffield that will produce trailing-edge actuation systems for Next-Generation 737, 737 MAX and 777 aircraft. Located alongside Sheffield University’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC), the proposed 2,300-square-metre plant, which represents an investment of over £20m, is part of a broader plan by Boeing to begin in-house manufacturing of actuation components and systems in the US and Britain. “The UK provides Boeing with the talent and infrastructure we need to grow and maintain a high level of productivity and quality to meet our significant order book,” said Sir Michael Arthur, president of Boeing Europe and managing director of Boeing UK and Ireland. “Our decision to start manufa

read more

news

Sensor technology extends range of movement for prosthetic arms

Robotic prosthetic arms allow amputees to perform a particular set of actions by twitching the remaining muscles in their severed limb. But the range of movements possible with existing robotic arms is severely limited, leading up to half of amputees using the devices to abandon them out of sheer frustration. Now researchers at Imperial College London have developed sensor technology for use with robotic arms that should ultimately make it possible to carry out a far greater range of actions using the prosthetics. The technology, published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, is designed to detect signals from motor neurons – nerve cells in the spinal cord that control muscles via fibres known as axons – rather than the damaged muscle in the shoulder or arm. This a

read more

news

Machine learning helps morphing-wing UAV land in cramped space

An unmanned aerial vehicle has carried out a perched landing, controlled by machine learning algorithm, for the first time. The achievement, by a team at BMT Defence Services and Bristol University, could lead to the development of efficient, morphing wing UAVs that can land in small or confined spaces, to deliver aid or gather intelligence. Existing aircraft are either fixed wing, which are very efficient but have limited manoeuvrability, or multi-rotor, which are very good at landing in small locations, but are inefficient, according to Antony Waldock, principal systems analyst at BMT Defence Services. So in a project funded by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), as part of its Autonomous Systems Underpinning Research (ASUR) programme, the team set about design

read more

news

Faraday Future takes on Tesla with FF 91

US startup Faraday Future has upped the ante in the EV market with the FF 91, its debut electric car that can accelerate from 0-60 mph in 2.39 seconds. Unveiling the FF 91 at CES in Las Vegas, the company showed off some of the vehicle’s key technology, such as driverless parking and a ‘summon’ mode that can be scheduled via an app. These autonomous features are enabled via an extensive sensor suite that includes 10 high definition cameras, 13 long and short-range radars, 12 ultrasonic sensors, and a retractable 3D lidar device on the car’s bonnet. The supercar-like acceleration comes courtesy of a multi-motor powertrain that allows variable all-wheel power distribution. Peak motor output is 783 kW, equivalent to 1050 horsepower. All this is powered by an enormous 130 kWh bat

read more

Next Page »« Previous Page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

raspberry-pi-572481_960_720